Thursday, April 29, 2010

Wild Grapes in Texas - Mustang Grapes

Wild Mustang Grapes


There are several types of wild grapes that are fairly common in the State of Texas. The three main species of wild grapes that are found locally are the Mustang Grape (Vitis mustangensis), the Sweet Mountain Grape (Vitis monticola), and the Winter Grape (Vitis cinerea var. helleri). Mustang Grapes are fairly abundant and the most easily found. The Mustang Grapes can have a rather tart flavor and have very tough skins. Mustang Grapes make very good jelly that can often found at some specialty grocery stores and at local farmers markets. The other types of grapes are sweeter but much less common and are a lot harder to find. Most of these grapes ripen from late summer to early fall. They are a pretty hardy type of grape and you can also make a fairly decent wine from Mustang Grapes.

Be aware. Be informed. Be prepared.

Riverwalker

9 comments:

Mayberry said...

Wish I had seen this before my Dad bought his grape vines! He plans on making some vino when his mature. Be on the lookout for B&B Vineyards! It'll only be two years from now.....

riverwalker said...

To: Mayberry

They grow wild at my farm place and make some pretty good "grape juice".

Thanks.

RW

ken powell said...

ken powell : i have an abbuntance of wild mustang grapes on my fayette co. tx. property. my question is : can this be used as a root stock for grafting with good wine grape ?

riverwalker said...

To: ken powell

Mustang grapes are quite acidic in nature but can make excellent wine if done properly. Rather than go into a lengthy discussion about red vs, white, etc. here is a link to excellent site with recipes for making several different types of wine from Mustang Grapes.

Here is an excellent reference source for wine recipes for Mustang grapes:



http://winemaking.jackkeller.net/nativew1.asp


As to your original question, I see no reason why they couldn’t be used as a root stock but with the right process Mustang grapes can be used to make several varieties of great tasting wines.

RW

Anonymous said...

I live in Comanche county. There are Mustang grapes but they aren't the most common. Yesterday I drove down a dry dusty road between Comanche and Blanket and the entire roadside was full of one of the other varieties of wild grapes, not sure which one, but the fruit is ripening at this time. The ditch was solid grape vines for at least 5 miles. If you drive between Dublin and Stephenville in Erath county on 377, Mustang grapes are just about solid on the fencerows and high in trees. The fruits have already ripened and just about disappeared at this time.

Anonymous said...

Is anyone interested in selling mustang grape juice? I'm in Pennsylvania and I would love to buy it.

Anonymous said...

email me at andrea_argenbright@yahoo.com

Anonymous said...

I'd be very interested in how you were able to identify your wild grapes as the Sweet Mountain Grape (Vitis monticola), and the Winter Grape (Vitis cinerea var. helleri). I'd be especially curious how you could possibly identify the vitis cinerea as the helleri cultivar unless you have access to DNA testing.

Jourdan said...

I live in Arlington. My mother's pickle recipe uses mustang grapes. I am learning how to make them and need my own supply. She lives in central Texas and has an abundant supply. I am looking for an area close to here. Any help would be greatly appreciated.